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Cross-Examination

The Art And Style Of Cross-examination, Protection Of The Right To Cross-examine: The Hearsay Rule

During a trial, virtually all evidence is presented to the fact finder (usually a jury in criminal cases, but sometimes a judge) through witnesses called by each party during that party's case. The party that has called a witness first has an opportunity to elicit testimony from that witness in direct examination. At the conclusion of direct examination, and usually with little delay, the opposing party will have a chance to cross-examine the witness (although he is not obliged to do so).

DANIEL C. RICHMAN

CASES

Maryland v. Craig, 497 U.S. 836 (1990).

United States v. Owens, 484 U.S. 554 (1988).

Additional topics

Law Library - American Law and Legal InformationCrime and Criminal Law