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Possession

Constructive Possession

Constructive possession is a legal theory used to extend possession to situations where a person has no hands-on custody of an object. Most courts say that constructive possession, also sometimes called "possession in law," exists where a person has knowledge of an object plus the ability to control the object, even if the person has no physical contact with it (United States

Under the doctrine of constructive possession, those who keep valuable items in a bank safety deposit box are considered in possession of the contents of the box even though they do not have actual physical custody of the items.
AP/WIDE WORLD PHOTOS

v. Derose, 74 F.3d 1177 [11th Cir. 1996]). For example, people often keep important papers and other valuable items in a bank safety deposit box. Although they do not have actual physical custody of these items, they do have knowledge of the items and the ability to exercise control over them. Thus, under the doctrine of constructive possession, they are still considered in possession of the contents of their safety deposit box. Constructive possession is frequently used in cases involving criminal possession.

Additional topics

Law Library - American Law and Legal InformationFree Legal Encyclopedia: Plc (public limited company) to Prerogative of mercyPossession - Possession Versus Ownership, Actual Possession, Constructive Possession, Criminal Possession, Possession And Intent