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GI Bill

Montgomery Gi Bill

Following the United States involvement in the VIETNAM WAR and the end of the military draft in 1973, the number of qualified young adults willing to voluntarily serve in the military declined. In 1984 Representative G. V. ("Sonny") Montgomery (D-MS), chairman of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, proposed a new GI Bill to encourage military service, even in times of peace. That year President RONALD REAGAN signed into law the Montgomery GI Bill (38 U.S.C.A. § 1401), which as of the early 2000s continues to provide optional benefits for qualified U.S. veterans.

The Montgomery GI Bill is a voluntary plan that requires a contribution from the soldier who chooses to take part. Upon entry into the ARMED SERVICES, including the NATIONAL GUARD and military reserves, participants may elect to have their military pay reduced by $100 each month of the first 12 months of service. This sacrifice makes them eligible to receive up to $400 a month for 36 months toward tuition and other educational expenses. To receive these benefits, soldiers must receive an honorable discharge, earn a high school diploma or its equivalent, and serve in active duty for the length of their enlistment. The federal government supplies funding but does not set standards or administer the plan; the VETERANS ADMINISTRATION determines whether a veteran is eligible, and the COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES (including religious and vocational schools) make admissions policies and keep track of expenditures.

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Law Library - American Law and Legal InformationFree Legal Encyclopedia: Freedom of association to Good WillGI Bill - Servicemen's Readjustment Act Of 1944, Montgomery Gi Bill, Effects Of The Gi Bill