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Democratic-Republican Party

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The Jeffersonian Republican party, better known as the Democratic-Republican Party, is an ancestor of the modern DEMOCRATIC PARTY. It evolved in the 1790s during the early days of GEORGE WASHINGTON's presidency. Washington had been unanimously chosen president in 1789 and had a broad base of support. THOMAS JEFFERSON served as Washington's SECRETARY OF STATE, while ALEXANDER HAMILTON served as secretary of the treasury. Jefferson and his followers favored states' rights and a strict interpretation of the Constitution. They believed that a powerful central government posed a threat to individual liberties. They viewed the United States more as a confederation of sovereign entities woven together by a common interest. Hamilton and his followers argued that a strong central government was essential to the unity of the new nation. They favored a broad interpretation of the Constitution, which they saw as a document that should evolve with the country as it grew.

Virtually all the leading political figures of the new country, starting with Washington, believed that political parties would polarize citizens and paralyze government. Hamilton and Jefferson agreed with this notion, but by 1793 the two groups that they represented had broken off into separate factions. Hamilton's group became the Federalists, while Jefferson's faction adopted the name "Democratic Republicans."

One early and divisive difference between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans was how they approached Britain and France. The Federalists believed that American foreign policy should favor British interests, while the Democratic-Republicans wanted to strengthen ties with the French. The Democratic-Republicans supported the government that had taken over France after the revolution of 1789.

On economic matters, the Jeffersonians differed strongly with the Federalists. The Democratic-Republicans believed in protecting the interests of the working classes—merchants, farmers, and laborers. They believed that an agrarian economy would best serve these citizens. They saw the establishment of a national BANK OF THE UNITED STATES (which Hamilton strongly favored) as a means of usurping power that belonged to individual states, and they also believed that it would be tied too closely to the rich. The Federalists saw industry and manufacturing as the best means of domestic growth and economic self-sufficiency. They favored the existence of protective tariffs on imports (which had Congress had adopted in 1789) both as a means of protecting domestic production and as a source of revenue.

The ratification in 1795 of Jay's Treaty (named after JOHN JAY) sparked anger at the Federalists from a wide array of citizens. The British were still in control of fur-trading posts in the Northwest Territories, and they were accused of encouraging Indians to rise up against the Americans. British ships were seizing American ships and impressing American sailors; they were also prohibiting American ships from engaging in trade with the West Indies. Jay, the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was sent to England as an envoy and returned with a treaty that gave the British a deadline for leaving the fur posts. Almost none of the other issues was addressed. A particularly unpopular provision of the treaty called for the U.S. to settle pre-Revolution debts to the British, totaling $2.6 million.

Jeffersonians, and even many Federalists, felt that the treaty had been too generous to the British, although Hamilton saw it as a necessary action because Britain generated tariff revenues through its exports. In 1796, JOHN ADAMS (a Federalist) was elected the nation's second president with 71 electoral votes, defeating Jefferson by three votes. Jefferson became vice president.

Meanwhile, relations with France were deteriorating rapidly. The notorious "XYZ Affair" in 1796 was typical of what Jeffersonians saw as the weakness of FEDERALISM. The XYZ AFFAIR involved an unsuccessful attempt by a French agent to exact bribes in exchange for France's cooperation in negotiating an international trade treaty. France, angered by the pro-British Jay's Treaty, began to interfere with American ships. An American delegation was sent to France, and the French demanded a loan to the French government as well as a $240,000 bribe.

Although American public opinion hardened against the French, President Adams tried to repair the situation diplomatically, which angered many Federalists who thought that declaring war on France was the best course of action. This split within the FEDERALIST PARTY helped to ensure Jefferson's victory in the 1800 presidential election. Democratic-Republicans also won a majority of the seats in Congress.

Jefferson's party dominated American politics for the next two decades. One reason was that the Jeffersonians proved themselves to be willing to adapt to change. An example was the LOUISIANA PURCHASE of 1803. As a Republican, Jefferson initially felt that the president did not have the power to make such a large purchase (828,000 square miles). He recognized, however, that the price of $15 million (about three cents per acre) was a significant bargain, and that the purchase would double the size of the U.S. and also eliminate the danger of having an imperialist French colony on its border. He went against his partisan instinct and made what he believed was the right decision for the country.

During the WAR OF 1812, Jefferson's successor, JAMES MADISON, battled the British overseas and the Federalists at home. Many Federalists, especially in the New England states, felt that the war would irreparably damage their ability to trade by sea with Europe. This anti-war stance proved unpopular, however, since the war ended in what most Americans perceived as a victory over Great Britain. Thus the Federalists were soundly defeated in the 1816 presidential election. The new president, JAMES MONROE, presided over a time of relative political calm during which many Federalists came to support the Republicans. This period was known as the "Era of Good Feeling," and although Monroe enjoyed wide support during his two terms in office, various factions were developing within his own party.

In the election of 1824, JOHN QUINCY ADAMS was elected president, narrowly defeating War of 1812 military hero ANDREW JACKSON. Although both were Democratic-Republicans, Adams's political philosophy was closer to that of the Federalists, and during his term in office the party split into two main factions. When Jackson ran for president in 1828, he ran as a Democrat—and won handily. Adams's wing of the party became known as the National Republicans, many of whom later formed the WHIG PARTY.

FURTHER READINGS

Bell, Rudolph M., 1973. Party and Faction in American Politics: The House of Representatives 1789–1801. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press.

Cunningham, Noble E., 1963. The Jeffersonian Republicans in Power: Party Operations, 1801–1809. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Univ. of North Carolina Press.

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about 1 year ago

Approve if you were sent here by PA cyber

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over 2 years ago

Ugghhh SO CONFUSING!! I am an 8th grader and this is the website my teacher gave me to research for a project...Not helping at all :( I think I am more confused and lost then I was before I came on this site!

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over 2 years ago

hey i agree with Zira 8 months ago this thing should be alot better, my cyber school made me go to this site for a project, and yet i have no idea what to write. Dont you think that a school would be more careful.Then again, we do live in america(no offense, and in the 21st centry. Compaired to how we used to be taught by college were learning hat people would be learing in 8th grade.

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over 1 year ago

This is so confusing....My Cyber School linked me here and its not much help at all.

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over 2 years ago

My cyber school linked me here too. I'm considering talking to them about this site.

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over 3 years ago

Why is this article so backwards? I assume, forgive me, that linking from a school sponsored site would set up a rather high bar of minimum standards- but hey, Ive been wrong before.

Welcome to the internet.

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over 3 years ago

Are educators making it up as they go along? Derp

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almost 2 years ago

this is a piece of poop

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almost 2 years ago

yea i was linked here too and i dont like it. i am talking to my cyber school about it.

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over 2 years ago

i hate this stuff

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over 1 year ago

Doing a connection im in 8th this site is formated weird.

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over 2 years ago

BLARG!

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8 months ago

because of all the comments im not even reading it

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almost 2 years ago

this is a piece of poop

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over 2 years ago

i agree. i had to read this for 8 grade social studies IA2P assignment and i was extremely confuzazilationinated (my word 4 confused) and im the smartest kid in the house (thats bad yet kinda cool cuz i have an older sister that never thinks at all) so i might be talking to my cyber shool teaacher about this website too.

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over 3 years ago

even the people who commet think that.

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over 3 years ago

The democratic-repuclican was the foundation to which we have our two parties it is not all that confusing once you get it its all good.

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about 3 years ago

confusing?

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about 1 year ago

Pacyber sent me here! .-.

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over 3 years ago

If the author is accurate (which I wonder about) apparently modern Democrats did a complete about-face, by the 20th century siding with the Adams view by favoring limited states rights (strong federal government - in their case nearly a totalitarian government) and a flexible interepretation of the Constitution (which means they can change and bend it to conform with their Marxist inclinations). Interesting.

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almost 4 years ago

All this is too confusing for a junior in high school. some of it makes since but you get confused on who is on whos side.

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over 3 years ago

this is not good for the poblic so i think that you should not put this page up so please recommend my statement please

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over 2 years ago

This is so confusing...
-_-

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over 1 year ago

My cyber school linked me here too... its all none sense to me...

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over 1 year ago

I aree with almost everyone here. Over half of us came here from a cyber school link for a connection for social studies... No help... I'm going to google...

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almost 2 years ago

Ok so this is super confusing!!I hate school so much

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almost 2 years ago

this is a piece of poop

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over 2 years ago

hi

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over 2 years ago

ugh im doing a project for social studies and i cannot find any good information this needs to be rearranged and put into cronological order. ex: in the very beggining it talks about things in 1793 then starts talking about things in 1989 this is very confusing to an eighth grader and apparently a junior. so please fix this! Thank you!

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over 2 years ago

u suck queef

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over 2 years ago

i hate this stuff

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over 1 year ago







The Jeffersonian Republican party, better known as the Democratic-Republican Party, is an ancestor of the modern DEMOCRATIC PARTY. It evolved in the 1790s during the early days of GEORGE WASHINGTON's presidency. Washington had been unanimously chosen president in 1789 and had a broad base of support. THOMAS JEFFERSON served as Washington's SECRETARY OF STATE, while ALEXANDER HAMILTON served as secretary of the treasury. Jefferson and his followers favored states' rights and a strict interpretation of the Constitution. They believed that a powerful central government posed a threat to individual liberties. They viewed the United States more as a confederation of sovereign entities woven together by a common interest. Hamilton and his followers argued that a strong central government was essential to the unity of the new nation. They favored a broad interpretation of the Constitution, which they saw as a document that should evolve with the country as it grew.

Virtually all the leading political figures of the new country, starting with Washington, believed that political parties would polarize citizens and paralyze government. Hamilton and Jefferson agreed with this notion, but by 1793 the two groups that they represented had broken off into separate factions. Hamilton's group became the Federalists, while Jefferson's faction adopted the name "Democratic Republicans."

One early and divisive difference between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans was how they approached Britain and France. The Federalists believed that American foreign policy should favor British interests, while the Democratic-Republicans wanted to strengthen ties with the French. The Democratic-Republicans supported the government that had taken over France after the revolution of 1789.

On economic matters, the Jeffersonians differed strongly with the Federalists. The Democratic-Republicans believed in protecting the interests of the working classes—merchants, farmers, and laborers. They believed that an agrarian economy would best serve these citizens. They saw the establishment of a national BANK OF THE UNITED STATES (which Hamilton strongly favored) as a means of usurping power that belonged to individual states, and they also believed that it would be tied too closely to the rich. The Federalists saw industry and manufacturing as the best means of domestic growth and economic self-sufficiency. They favored the existence of protective tariffs on imports (which had Congress had adopted in 1789) both as a means of protecting domestic production and as a source of revenue.

The ratification in 1795 of Jay's Treaty (named after JOHN JAY) sparked anger at the Federalists from a wide array of citizens. The British were still in control of fur-trading posts in the Northwest Territories, and they were accused of encouraging Indians to rise up against the Americans. British ships were seizing American ships and impressing American sailors; they were also prohibiting American ships from engaging in trade with the West Indies. Jay, the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was sent to England as an envoy and returned with a treaty that gave the British a deadline for leaving the fur posts. Almost none of the other issues was addressed. A particularly unpopular provision of the treaty called for the U.S. to settle pre-Revolution debts to the British, totaling $2.6 million.



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Jeffersonians, and even many Federalists, felt that the treaty had been too generous to the British, although Hamilton saw it as a necessary action because Britain generated tariff revenues through its exports. In 1796, JOHN ADAMS (a Federalist) was elected the nation's second president with 71 electoral votes, defeating Jefferson by three votes. Jefferson became vice president.

Meanwhile, relations with France were deteriorating rapidly. The notorious "XYZ Affair" in 1796 was typical of what Jeffersonians saw as the weakness of FEDERALISM. The XYZ AFFAIR involved an unsuccessful attempt by a French agent to exact bribes in exchange for France's cooperation in negotiating an international trade treaty. France, angered by the pro-British Jay's Treaty, began to interfere with American ships. An American delegation was sent to France, and the French demanded a loan to the French government as well as a $240,000 bribe.

Although American public opinion hardened against the French, President Adams tried to repair the situation diplomatically, which angered many Federalists who thought that declaring war on France was the best course of action. This split within the FEDERALIST PARTY helped to ensure Jefferson's victory in the 1800 presidential election. Democratic-Republicans also won a majority of the seats in Congress.

Jefferson's party dominated American politics for the next two decades. One reason was that the Jeffersonians proved themselves to be willing to adapt to change. An example was the LOUISIANA PURCHASE of 1803. As a Republican, Jefferson initially felt that the president did not have the power to make such a large purchase (828,000 square miles). He recognized, however, that the price of $15 million (about three cents per acre) was a significant bargain, and that the purchase would double the size of the U.S. and also eliminate the danger of having an imperialist French colony on its border. He went against his partisan instinct and made what he believed was the right decision for the country.

During the WAR OF 1812, Jefferson's successor, JAMES MADISON, battled the British overseas and the Federalists at home. Many Federalists, especially in the New England states, felt that the war would irreparably damage their ability to trade by sea with Europe. This anti-war stance proved unpopular, however, since the war ended in what most Americans perceived as a victory over Great Britain. Thus the Federalists were soundly defeated in the 1816 presidential election. The new president, JAMES MONROE, presided over a time of relative political calm during which many Federalists came to support the Republicans. This period was known as the "Era of Good Feeling," and although Monroe enjoyed wide support during his two terms in office, various factions were developing within his own party.

In the election of 1824, JOHN QUINCY ADAMS was elected president, narrowly defeating War of 1812 military hero ANDREW JACKSON. Although both were Democratic-Republicans, Adams's political philosophy was closer to that of the Federalists, and during his term in office the party split into two main factions. When Jackson ran for president in 1828, he ran as a Democrat—and won handily. Adams's wing of the party became known as the National Republicans, many of whom later formed the WHIG PARTY.


FURTHER READINGS

Bell, Rudolph M., 1973. Party and Faction in American Politics: The House of Representatives 1789–1801. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press.

Cunningham, Noble E., 1963. The Jeffersonian Republicans in Power: Party Operations, 1801–1809. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Univ. of North Carolina Press.




Read more: Democratic-Republican Party - Federalists, Republicans, Jefferson, and American - JRank Articles http://law.jrank.org/pages/6058/Democratic-Republican-Party.html#ixzz2ENTMRJvP

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over 3 years ago

The Democratic Republicans were the forerunners to both the current-age Democrats and Republicans. The Federalist party simply died out while the D-Rs split into two factions, which were the start of the line that would lead to the modern Democrats and Republicans.

So everyone shut up.

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over 2 years ago

u have nooo life

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almost 4 years ago

The Democratic-Republicans are NOT the "ancestor of the modern DEMOCRATIC PARTY." In fact...they are the ancestor of the modern REPUBLICAN PARTY which was formed in 1854 as a revival of the Democratic-Republicans in honor of Thomas Jefferson's party. As we today think of the Republicans as the party of Lincoln, at the time of Lincoln, they thought of themselves as the Party of Jefferson.

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over 1 year ago

this poop is sdo poopin confusing. i think im going to go poop

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over 2 years ago

more info

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almost 2 years ago

You all blow

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8 months ago

PACYBER sent me here as well. I don't understand this garbage whatsoever.

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over 1 year ago

This is really confusing. I'm here for a project and it's just confusing.... i'm never coming back to this site again

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over 1 year ago

this is retarded no real information at all

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over 2 years ago

is the stae or federal government better? which ones better?

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over 1 year ago

God bless america! 0_0

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over 2 years ago

u have nooo life

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over 1 year ago

Umm...confused as hell. In 8th grade. this was for a project. I'm in cyber-school.

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over 2 years ago

ur suspkcdnpdscondkpdskic

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over 2 years ago

Okay people, this IS factually correct. I know because I have just written a 15+ pg. project on the history of American Political Parties. The Democratic-Republicans were created after teh Federalists, they were for state-governments and strict constitutional interpretation, and the Federalists were for the opposite. The Democratic-Republicans were the main party for around 40 years after that, then they split. One group left, and formed the National Republican Party, and the other became the Democratic Party. That is why they have such different outlooks, the party split overthose. The ones who left had more right-side values, the ones who stayed had more left-side values.

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about 2 years ago

there is no such thing as the "democratic-republican" party. This is a ficticious name used by modern day liberal historians to distort the truth. There is no such reference in the 1700 or 1800's. Shepdawgs post is accurate to the point that the Jeffersonian republican is the founding of the 1854 republican party. Democrats (conservative or moderate) have long held social programs and a strong centralized and/or federal government. It is confusing because it is a lie.



Also, please read up on the differences between a democracy and a republic. People throw around processes and forms of government as if they are interchangeable and they are not

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4 months ago

this is an epic fail. if anyone needs help this guy on youtube Keith Hughes, is a lifesaver he does all things history, He'll probably have exactly what you're looking for but you have to add in the search box for dummies! hope this helps it helped me alot

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5 months ago

wow this is so easy I mean come on all you have to do is find comparisons and contrasts between the Democratic-Republican Party and the Federalist Party. What is so hard?

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5 months ago

read the crap it will help i swear

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over 1 year ago

Honestly, I don't see what's so bad about this article. All I see is a bunch of lazy students who don't even know how to spell. I was send here through Cyber school and I actually found this website helpful.

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8 months ago

I was sent here by Pacyber, and It made me more confused then I was originally. ;-;

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9 months ago

Honestly, I see nothing wrong with this article as far as the lesson goes. However, if you look anywhere else online, it does not make any sense. SO these teachers need to make something right because a lot of us are stuck or have been stuck.

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9 months ago

This doesn't even make any sense.

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10 months ago

This site makes no sense! Seriously, what is the purpose?!

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over 1 year ago

Wut.

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over 1 year ago

Honestly, I don't see what's so bad about this article. All I see is a bunch of lazy students who don't even know how to spell. I was send here through Cyber school and I actually found this website helpful.

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over 1 year ago

This is an awesome article!

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over 1 year ago

idk wat ya'll r talkin' bout this an't hard to understand im 12 n an 8th grader n i can understand it

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over 1 year ago

i dont know what ya'll r talking bout this wasnt confusing at all im an 8th grade and im 12 i n i got this. my report is awesome

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4 months ago

jeez people wuts rong so e-z fa reel yal

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5 months ago

its information if its hard to understand ask for help if you wont do that don't complain about it. it annoying i understood the information and i am using this through my cyber school as well which i am taking and have skipped to grades becuase of my ability to not complain and try to acheive something

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6 months ago

this stupid im in the 9th grade its so confusing omfg dang

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about 1 month ago


i don"t know whats going on this is happening an thats happening whats going on

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2 months ago

The very first sentence in this piece is wrong and from there it gets worse. Jefferson would turn over in his grave if he heard anyone calling him a democrat, or a democratic republican. He was the founder of the Republican Party and in that day Federalists and Republicans detested democrats and aristocrats. Jackson was the founder of the Democrat Party. www.senseofcitizens.org has a good short fun-to-read money oriented history lesson on this at their DIFFERENCE page.