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Assassination - Political Assassination By U.s Government Employees, Further Readings

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Murder committed by a perpetrator without the personal provocation of the victim, who is usually a government official.

First used in medieval times to describe the murders of prominent Christians by the Hashshashin, a secret Islamic sect, the word assassination is used in the twenty-first century to describe murders committed for political reasons, especially against government officials. Assassination may be used as a political weapon by a state as well as by an individual; it may be directed at the establishment or used by it.

The term assassination is generally applied only to political murders—in the United States, most commonly to attempts on the life of the president. However, the classification of any one incident as an assassination may be in part a matter of perception. The "assassination" of the outlaw Jesse James, in 1882, provides an example of the difficulties. Thomas T. Crittenden, governor of Missouri, assumed that being seen as responsible for the death of the notorious outlaw would be good for his political career. For this reason, Crittenden granted each of the killers a pardon in addition to a $10,000 reward. But the American public spoke vehemently against James's killers, dubbing them assassins and his death an assassination. Crittenden was vilified by the American people, and his political career was destroyed.

It is not always easy to guess the motivations of those who attempt assassinations or to understand the historical and legal implications of their actions. The anti-constitutional nature of assassination has made it a focal point for conspiracies and conspiracy theories from the beginning. The first attempt at the assassination of a U.S. president was Richard Lawrence's attack on ANDREW JACKSON in 1835. Although a jury acquitted Lawrence on the ground of insanity, Jackson was convinced that the attack was part of a WHIG PARTY conspiracy.

The 1865 assassination of President ABRAHAM LINCOLN by John Wilkes Booth prompted its own set of theories. In a controversial decision, a military tribunal convicted nine people of conspiring in Lincoln's assassination. In the case of one of those hanged for the crime, Mary E. Surratt, all that could be proved was that she owned the rooming house in which the conspirators plotted. Nonetheless, high emotions at the end of the Civil War resulted in her execution. After sentiments cooled and talk of conspiracies calmed, the two surviving conspirators imprisoned for Lincoln's death gained pardons from President ANDREW JOHNSON.

Even greater controversy was caused when the public was deprived of the opportunity to see Lee Harvey Oswald tried for the assassination, in 1963, of President JOHN F. KENNEDY. Oswald's death at the hands of JACK RUBY sparked theories of conspiracy that ranged from Communist plots to Mafia hits to cover-ups by U.S. officials. President LYNDON B. JOHNSON appointed a group of national figures, led by Supreme Court Chief Justice EARL WARREN, to investigate the assassination and issue a report. The WARREN COMMISSION concluded that Oswald had acted alone.

Despite this, conspiracy theories remained widespread in books and in films like Oliver Stone's JFK: The Untold Story (released in 1991). In an attempt to calm public suspicions surrounding the Kennedy assassination, the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992 (44 U.S.C.A. § 2107) was passed by Congress. The act released much of

President William McKinley was shot by Leon F. Czolgosz, on September 6, 1901, at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. McKinley died on September 14.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

the Kennedy assassination material in government files. As of 2003, its effectiveness at stilling concern over a possible conspiracy remained to be seen.

It has become clear that the public demands a thorough investigation of any attempt on a president's life. Because it is a crime to advocate the assassination of any U.S. president, even threats are carefully investigated. In U.S. history, four presidents have lost their lives to assassins: Abraham Lincoln, JAMES GARFIELD, WILLIAM MCKINLEY, and John F. Kennedy.

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over 7 years ago

"Even greater controversy was caused when the public was deprived of the opportunity to see Lee Harvey Oswald tried" ??? I think the Conspiracy is more about the Murder of the President and the interests at stake, The Political Implications Of the Assassination I think, the people were more concerned with getting past this Little Pawn Fall Guy Oswald who may have or had not Shot the President it doesn't matter if he did or not the president is dead and now we will get a new one that will be sure to tow the line.