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Twigg v. Mays - Significance, Switched At Birth, The Rights Of A Child, Impact, Child Emancipation

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Plaintiff

Ernest and Regina Twigg

Defendant

Robert Mays

Plaintiff's Claim

That the parental rights held by the Twiggs compelled that they be granted custody of 14- year-old Kimberley Mays who was switched at birth with another newborn.

Chief Lawyer for Plaintiff

John Blakely

Chief Defense Lawyers

George Russ, David Denkin (guardian ad litem)

Judge

Stephen Dakan

Place

Sarasota County, Florida

Date of Decision

18 August 1993

Decision

Ruled in favor of Mays, by terminating the Twiggs' legal rights to Kimberly and clearing the way for Robert Mays to adopt her.

Related Cases

  • Padgett v. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, 577 So.2d 565 (Fla. 1991).
  • Kingsley v. Kingsley, 623 So 2d 780 (1993).
  • In Re Baby Girl Clausen, 442 Mich. 648, 502 N. W. 2d 649 (1993).
  • Smith v. Langford, 255 So.2d 712 (Fla. 1st DCA 1997).

Sources

Fast, Julius, and Timothy Fast. The Legal Atlas of the United States. New York: Facts on File, 1997.

Further Readings

  • Gregory, John De Witt, Peter N. Swisher, and Sheryl L. Scheible. Understanding Family Law. New York: Matthew Bender, 1993.
  • Krause, Harry D., ed. Child Law: Parent, Child, and State. New York: New York University Press, 1992.
  • Mayoue, John C. Competing Interests in Family Law: Legal Rights and Duties of Third Parties, Spouses, and Significant Others. Chicago: American Bar Association, Section of Family Law, 1998.
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