Other Free Encyclopedias » Law Library - American Law and Legal Information » Notable Trials and Court Cases - 1973 to 1980

Morton v. Mancari - Significance, Preferences And The Fifth Amendment, Native Americans Not Ethnic, Impact

william appellant decision court

Appellant

Rogers Clark Morton, U.S. Secretary of Interior

Appellee

Mancari, et al.

Appellant's Claim

That the federal government's use of Native American preferences in personnel decisions did not violate equal protection under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment.

Chief Lawyer for Appellant

Harry R. Sachse

Chief Lawyer for Appellee

Gene E. Franchini

Justices for the Court

Harry A. Blackmun (writing for the Court), William J. Brennan, Jr., Warren E. Burger, William O. Douglas, Thurgood Marshall, Lewis F. Powell, Jr., William H. Rehnquist, Potter Stewart, Byron R. White

Justices Dissenting

None

Place

Washington, D.C.

Date of Decision

17 June 1974

Decision

Upheld the United States' claim and overturned a lower court's decision prohibiting use of Native American preferences in governmental personnel hiring and job promotion practices.

Related Cases

  • Board of County Commissioners v. Seber, 318 U.S. 705 (1943).
  • United States v. Antelope, 430 U.S. 641 (1977).
  • County of Oneida v. Oneida Indian Nation, 470 U.S. 226 (1985).
  • Traynor v. Turnage, 485 U.S. 535 (1988).

Further Readings

  • Getches, David H., Charles F. Wilkinson, and Robert A. Williams, Jr. Cases and Materials on Federal Indian Law, 3rd ed. St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co., 1993.
  • Williams, David C. "The Borders of the Equal Protection Clause: Indians as Peoples." U.C.L.A. Law Review, Vol. 38, 1991, pp. 759-870.
Murray R. Gold Trials: 1976-92 - A Former Son-in-law, A Dead Culprit?, Second Trial, … Waving In The Wind" [next] [back] Moore v. East Cleveland - Sanctity Of The Family, The Dissenting Opinions, Impact

User Comments

Your email address will be altered so spam harvesting bots can't read it easily.
Hide my email completely instead?

Cancel or